Wwe wrestlers died from steroids

On April 29, 1999, the WWF made its return to terrestrial television , airing a special program known as SmackDown! on the fledgling UPN network. The Thursday night show became a weekly series on August 26, 1999—competing directly with WCW's Thursday night program Thunder on TBS . In 2000, the WWF, in collaboration with television network NBC , announced the creation of the XFL , a new professional football league that debuted in 2001. [31] The league had high ratings for the first few weeks, but initial interest waned and its ratings plunged to dismally low levels (one of its games was the lowest-rated prime-time show in the history of American television). NBC walked out on the venture after only one season, but McMahon intended to continue alone. However, after being unable to reach a deal with UPN, McMahon shut down the XFL. [32]


In 2007, Chris Benoit, a wrestler who had allegedly suffered multiple concussions, killed his wife, his 7-year-old son and himself. Dr. Bennet Omalu, a doctor who examined his brain, diagnosed him with a severe case of CTE. He was the first professional wrestler to receive such a diagnosis. Later, Omalu diagnosed the same condition in another deceased wrestler, Andrew "Test" Martin, and he is examining the brains of three other wrestlers to see if there is evidence of the disease. 

In 2008, the WWE instituted a concussion management program. However, the 17-count lawsuit says that the company was well aware of the dangers for a long time and did nothing. For example, it says that the company discussed the dangers of concussions in a scripted event as early as 1995.

 

Unfortunately, pro wrestling has seen an awful lot of former stars die at relatively young ages. While one might think the high death rate in this often dangerous athletic occupation would be caused be tragic accidents, such as the 50-foot fall that killed Owen Hart in front of a pay-per-view crowd in 1999, most wrestlers who have died young have succumb to either suicide, overdoses, or most surprisingly at first glance, perhaps, cardiovascular disease — all of which can be side effects of the rough-and-tumble lifestyle professional wrestlers often lead.

Wrestling alongside strongmen with statuesque bodies and dandies with bleached hair, the hirsute Steele was hard to miss. Bald, hunched slightly over and with that tongue sticking out (stained green thanks to a handful of breath mints), there was no wrestler in any of the territories that resembled him. And by the early-1980s, with Vince McMahon's WWE (previously known as the WWF) redefining wrestling and calling it "sports entertainment," characters like Steele, who were perfect for nationwide television audiences, were in demand. Crowds would wait in anticipation for Steele to undo the turnbuckle and send the stuffing flying out everywhere as if he was actually eating it. 

Wwe wrestlers died from steroids

wwe wrestlers died from steroids

Wrestling alongside strongmen with statuesque bodies and dandies with bleached hair, the hirsute Steele was hard to miss. Bald, hunched slightly over and with that tongue sticking out (stained green thanks to a handful of breath mints), there was no wrestler in any of the territories that resembled him. And by the early-1980s, with Vince McMahon's WWE (previously known as the WWF) redefining wrestling and calling it "sports entertainment," characters like Steele, who were perfect for nationwide television audiences, were in demand. Crowds would wait in anticipation for Steele to undo the turnbuckle and send the stuffing flying out everywhere as if he was actually eating it. 

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