Steroid heart failure

Many years ago, we lost our first Dobie at age 11. She suddenly vomited, her gums were white and she panted. We took her to the vet, where she exhibited agonal breathing, and the vet put her down. He explained that she had cardiomyopathy, something many Dobies get, as mentioned above. I had never heard of this, but I did some research (before the Internet was available) and found info in a Japanese vet journal. They had just come out with the Ubiquonone form of CoQ10, and it wasn't commonly known about or used in the US, but it was available. I managed to buy it and started giving our next dog, and then all subsequent dogs, CoQ10, according to their individual weights. We had a Bassett hound, who lived for 18 years, 2 other Dobies who lived to be 15, one who died of a massive infection from contact with an infected dog and had no evidence of cardio, the other of an accident. We took in a few rescue mutts, including a Great Dane we 'inherited' at ago 12, who died of long bone cancer at age 15. All lived longer and in good health far longer than most dogs. I credit the CoQ10 with keeping them healthy and being able to prolong their lives.

A recent study 28 of patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes showed a decrease in levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides with use of fenugreek. A 1990 double-blind, placebo-controlled study 31 of 10 patients with type 1 diabetes (formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes) also showed a significant decrease in levels of total cholesterol, LDL and very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) in the patients receiving fenugreek. It is still too early to fully evaluate the lipid-lowering effects of this product, but some modest improvement is apparent. Well-designed clinical trials should be undertaken in the future.

Prednisone is a drug that belongs to the corticosteroid drug class, and is an anti-inflammatory and immune system suppressant. It's used to treat a variety of diseases and conditions, for example: inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), lupus, asthma, cancers, and several types of arthritis.

Common side effects are weight gain, headache, fluid retention, and muscle weakness. Other effects and adverse events include glaucoma, cataracts, obesity, facial hair growth, moon face, and growth retardation in children. This medicine also causes psychiatric problems, for example: depression, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and psychotic behavior. Serious side effects include reactions to diabetes drugs, infections, and necrosis of the hips and joints.

Corticosteroids like prednisone, have many drug interactions; examples include: estrogens, phenytoin (Dilantin), diuretics, warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), and diabetes drugs. Prednisone is available as tablets of 1, , 10, 20, and 50 mg; extended release tablets of 1, 2, and 5mg; and oral solution of 5mg/5ml. It's use during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. This medicine is secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in infants who are nursing. You should not stop taking prednisone abruptly because it can cause withdrawal symptoms and adrenal failure. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about beta-blockers. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about prednisone.

If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Hi,
I have a little 10 pound dog that was diagnosed in 2009 with congestive heart failure and I was told in 2010 he had a year to live by the vet cardiologist. He takes Lasix, vetmedin, enalapril, and diltiazam and a cough med to help with his cough and also the vet said to relax the blood vessels, just recently his stomach has blown up and the reg vet at first didn't seem comfortable to the idea of draining his stomach due to messing up the albumin balance( I believe). I know some people who take their dog to get drained every few weeks for heart failure so I guess it really just seems to vary according to each vet....what I'm wondering is how painful is it to drain the belly especially since typically this becomes a very frequent procedure and a last attempt to keep our pets alive! As much as I want every last minute with my pet I also don't want him to suffer either!

Steroid heart failure

steroid heart failure

Hi,
I have a little 10 pound dog that was diagnosed in 2009 with congestive heart failure and I was told in 2010 he had a year to live by the vet cardiologist. He takes Lasix, vetmedin, enalapril, and diltiazam and a cough med to help with his cough and also the vet said to relax the blood vessels, just recently his stomach has blown up and the reg vet at first didn't seem comfortable to the idea of draining his stomach due to messing up the albumin balance( I believe). I know some people who take their dog to get drained every few weeks for heart failure so I guess it really just seems to vary according to each vet....what I'm wondering is how painful is it to drain the belly especially since typically this becomes a very frequent procedure and a last attempt to keep our pets alive! As much as I want every last minute with my pet I also don't want him to suffer either!

Media:

steroid heart failuresteroid heart failuresteroid heart failuresteroid heart failuresteroid heart failure