Oral corticosteroids in pregnancy

Normally the adrenal glands release cortisol into the blood stream every morning. The brain monitors this amount and regulates the adrenal function. It cannot tell the difference between its own natural cortisone and that of steroid medicines. Therefore, when a person takes high doses of steroids over a long time, the brain may decrease or stop cortisol production. This is called adrenal suppression. Healthcare providers generally decrease a steroid dosage slowly to allow the adrenal gland to recover and produce cortisol at a normal level again. If you have been on steroids long-term do not stop taking them suddenly. Follow your doctor's prescription.

Dr. Harold Farber , associate professor of pediatrics in the section of pulmonary medicine at Baylor, and colleagues analyzed data from children between 1 and 18 years of age with an asthma diagnosis from January 2011 to January 2016 using a computerized database from Texas Children’s Health Plan, a health maintenance organization for those eligible for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program. They found that close to half of the children under 5 years of age with an asthma diagnosis had an oral corticosteroid prescription in the previous year and more than 40 percent of children in the older age group with an asthma diagnosis had one or more oral corticosteroid prescriptions in the previous year.

Oral corticosteroids in pregnancy

oral corticosteroids in pregnancy

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